THE DAY 

Series Producer | director

Documentary | Current Affairs

BRITAIN

DIED

In Andrew Marr's first series on television, he explores the idea that Britain is effectively dead and turns political detective, looking for the day, the event or the person that killed it.

 

Made just after the first election of the newly devolved Scottish Parliament, the series examines the cumulative effects of Europe, globalisation, privatisation and devolution on the old Britain that we imagine still existed just after the war.

“…eloquent and entertaining… …provocative…” Times


“…you won’t want to miss this… …With eloquent images to put flesh on his thesis… …thought provoking viewing.” Express.

The Day Britain Died

3 x 40’ with Wark Clements for BBC2

Shot in the UK, France, Denmark & Sweden

 

Written and Presented by ANDREW MARR

Camera ANDY JACKSON

Drama Scripts PAT MILLS

Sound NIC JONES, DOUGLAS KERR

Assistant Producers

         BAVESH HINDOCHA

DOMINIQUE MIDDLETON

Exec Producers 

KATIE LANDER

ALAN CLEMENTS

Editor JAMES MILNER-SMYTHE

Series produced and directed by

IAN LILLEY

 

Review of the book that Andrew wrote as the series was being made:

 

It's a wide-ranging, incisively-written and often witty treatise. Marr wrote The Day Britain Died to accompany a television series, travelling the country to interview people at all points on the political and ideological spectrum, from romantic Little-Englander ruralists, to businessmen relishing their opportunities in the new global service industries, to Eurosceptics, to Bangladeshi entrepreneurs, to Green theorists and politicians. The views expressed on national identity and the future are varied, energetic and often surprising, but cannot disguise a sense that, in contrast to its neighbours, England as a nation is running on empty.

 

Andrew Marr places this against the background of a subtle, considered discussion of the historical and political forces that shaped Britain and determined its relations with Europe, the USA and the rest of the world. He concludes with a powerfully-argued case for a revitalised British federation of interdependent states, backed up with a strong written constitution (and Alan Bennett as president--this may or may not be a joke). The issues this book raises are difficult and divisive, yet affect the lives of everyone living in the place still called Britain. Robin Davidson

© 2015 Ian Lilley